Computers

With Friends Like This…

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With friends like this, who needs family?

Yesterday, I entered a weekly contest that Amazon.com runs. This week’s prize is a Kindle 3G. It’s only the second time I’ve entered an Amazon contest.

After entering, I was offered the opportunity to update my Facebook status. It was optional. Even though spreading the word about the contest feels counterintuitive, because it encourages more people to enter, I decided that what Amazon is doing is nice and I wanted to help spread the Amazon love.

So, I posted the following:

I am so on the fence for buying a Kindle. Winning one would solve my problem. 🙂

Below that was the full link and description to the contest.

Within minutes, a buddy of mine IM’ed me to tell me that he believed my Facebook account was hacked! I got a huge laugh out of that, because I correctly pointed out that his had been hacked a couple of months back!

I assured him that it was me that essentially created an ad for Amazon.

Today, I got a package from Amazon. Here’s a photo, including a gift card (click for a larger version):

KindleGiftWrappingAndCard

A different friend of mine (you know who you are!) saw my update and decided to create a contest of one and he immediately declared me the winner! Wow, unbelievable. I don’t know what to say, except:

Thanks, you are beyond awesome!

I have no doubt that I am going to love this. It turns out that my top five favorite gadgets of all time were things I never thought I wanted, let alone needed. Someone else knew better and bought it for me. Within a day, each became so indispensable to me that I couldn’t imagine how I lived without it the day before (e.g., my first email-only Blackberry, my first GPS, my first Treo, my current Droid, my Garmin Forerunner).

Let’s safely add the Kindle to that list.

Thanks PSC! Smile

Proposal to Allow Rooting Android

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Rooting is the process of gaining low-level control of your cell phone’s operating system (I’m only going to discuss Android in this post). It voids your warranty (presumably both from your carrier and the phone manufacturer). That’s fine, perhaps it even should.

Still, carriers and phone companies try to actively stop you from rooting. There are a few obviously legitimate reasons/concerns on their part:

  1. Supporting a rooted phone can cost the companies in a number of ways
  2. Rooted phones can be used to access services that the carriers want to charge a premium for (e.g., Tethering)
  3. Problems with a rooted phone are often misunderstood by the consumer, reflecting incorrectly (and poorly) on the carrier or phone manufacturer

There are also a few shakier arguments against rooting. Rather than give them credence, or get distracted in arguing their merits, let’s skip them.

There are many legitimate reasons to root, covered in many articles. Let’s leave that topic for a more technical post, this isn’t that.

A small percentage of consumers actually root, but given the explosive growth of Android phones worldwide, the absolute number of rooters is large. They are also the most vocal users, trying to convince others to do it too.

When a rooted phone goes bad, the consumer tries to unroot and return to stock (removing all traces of their previous rooting and customization), in the hopes that the carrier will then fix the phone or replace it under warranty. Of course, the carrier might not be able to detect that the phone was previously rooted and perhaps even ruined by virtue of the rooting (overclocking the CPU for example). In that case, the carrier may indeed incur a cost that they shouldn’t bear.

My proposal:

Make it brain dead easy to root. When rooting (using an app provided by the carrier/manufacturer), ensure that the consumer is warned of the dangers and that the warranty is being voided. Also ensure that they know their account is flagged that they have opted out of the warranty.

This removes any extra support costs. In fact, returning the phone to stock will make no difference, as the user has forever agreed that this specific phone has knowingly and willingly revoked it’s right to be serviced, for any reason whatsoever.

I would go further and suggest that the carriers/manufacturers will make more money in this scenario, because if the user just drops their phone and breaks it, it is not covered, period. That will cause some percentage of rooters to have to purchase a new phone should anything go wrong with their phone, even if it isn’t related to the rooting.

Of course, that might cause many people not to root. That shouldn’t bother the carriers, since that’s the position they would like to see today.

Next, concern #2 above. While there might be a number of concerns, mostly, it boils down to Tethering, the ability to use your phone as a WiFi or USB modem for your laptop. The concern is that you can utilize significantly more data/bandwidth in this manner (e.g., streaming movies to your laptop) than you would ever practically use on your phone itself (assuming you had an unlimited data plan on your phone to begin with).

The carriers are concerned about monetary loss (they charge a hefty price for devices that Tether, or for tethering plans on the phones) as well as network quality if too many people clog the airwaves (with or without paying them) and slow down the network for all users.

My proposed solution for #2 is to charge no premium for tethering (with or without rooting!), but simply meter the data (no more unlimited plans, or price unlimited plans knowing that people will tether). AT&T is doing this already, but they charge $20/month for the right to tether, which is outrageous, since they charge for every byte of data transferred. Who cares how/why I used the data, you charge me for it.

That’s it. Let’s summarize:

  1. Make the voided warranty an overt opt-in so that support costs go to zero for any rooted phone.
  2. Charge for all data coming through the phone (tiers are fine, including unlimited), so that the carriers benefit if people tether.

NginX and WordPress OpenID Plugin

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I normally have super powers when it comes to persevering through annoying technical problems. On rare occasions, Kryptonite appears out of nowhere and strips me of those powers.

This blog is powered by WordPress.org software. I use a variety of plugins to make my life a bit easier. One of my favorites is the OpenID WordPress Plugin. I’ve been using it since it first came out and I’m very happy with it.

Because I was using it from the beginning, I lived through a few rough upgrades (not complaining, just explaining). The problems always got sorted out quickly.

Back in June 2008 (yes, a long time ago), I switched from Apache to NginX and have never looked back. The trickiest part of switching a WordPress site (especially WordPress MU, even more so with BuddyPress installed!) is converting the Rewrite Rules that are typically stored in a .htaccess file into nginx syntax.

While I got my initial attempt to work, I’ve grown way more comfortable and familiar with nginx over the past year, and I’ve tweaked my rewrite rules quite a bit.

Along the way, there were numerous updates of the OpenID Plugin as well. Most times things just kept working. Once, OpenID stopped working, and I tried to track it down. I gave up pretty quickly because I had seen that behavior before with an individual update of the plugin. Sure enough, the next update got me working again.

Then at some point, it stopped again. At this point I had conditioned myself to ignore it, and I went back to logging in with a password (something I really prefer not to do). This lasted for months. At some point, the plugin got updated at least twice, and things still didn’t work for me. Now I was getting annoyed.

I stopped trying to use OpenID. Two days ago I tried again, I can’t explain why. I got a strange Google Toolbar redirect error message. I did a search, and someone was complaining about something that looked similar, but had nothing to do with WordPress. A Google employee responded to him that he should temporarily disable the Toolbar (in Firefox) and see if the problem went away.

I decided to try that and instead of a strange Google error, I simply got a 404. What? A simple 404 couldn’t be the plugin’s fault. Time to dig in (finally).

I turned on nginx debugging and tried to log in. I was shocked when I saw that the error had nothing to do with the plugin. Instead, my nginx rules weren’t even calling in to PHP to let the plugin do its work.

Without a doubt, I had an error in one of my rewrite rules in nginx. There’s a possibility that at some point, the plugin changed the way it redirects, so that it was a combination of a new URL coming back to me (that I wasn’t catching correctly) or simply one of my changes in nginx, without the plugin doing anything different.

I added a new rule and was able to log in (for the first time in over six months!) via OpenID.

In this case, I let my own normal persistence fade, because I incorrectly assumed that the problem was contained in the plugin. Shame on me!

Self-Service Pain

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It’s extremely easy to cause yourself a lot of pain while performing maintenance on your computer. Here are two sure-fire steps:

  1. Do something really stupid, while being aware that you are doing so!
  2. Compound the error by being macho, and wanting to fix it manually!

Voila! You will have no one to blame but yourself for your pain, and you can be proud enough of the time wasted to waste a little more by publicly flogging yourself in a blog (like, say, this one…).

Here’s what I did to myself this morning…

Yesterday was Patch Tuesday at Microsoft. When I booted up this moring, Windows informed me that there were four critical updates available, and two optional ones. I looked over the list and was happy to accept the four critical updates.

Of the two optional ones, one was for my LAN device (which I’ve successfully updated in the past, so I was happy to include that). The other was for an external tablet device that I don’t own, and will likely never own. So, why did I check to include it? Only because I thought it might be more efficient to have the updated driver (dormant) on my system, than to hide it from future updates, but make Windows notice each time that it was out-of-date.

Oh oh, first big dumb mistake. When I restarted the computer, installing that driver triggered Vista to think that I now had a Tablet device, and it automatically turned on Tablet PC mode. In itself, that wouldn’t be so bad, except that it disabled my touchpad, which is my only mouse. 🙁

Other than resizing and moving windows around, Windows (XP and Vista) are suprisingly easy to navigate around with only a keyboard, even without Accessibility settings turned on.

I could have undone the Windows Update quickly and painlessly, through the keyboard. But no, I’m macho and need to figure out how to fix this on my own. I launched a browser, searched Google, and found out how to turn off Tablet PC mode. That worked (Tablet PC mode was off) but my touchpad was still dead, even after a reboot.

I found an updated Synaptics Touchpad driver for Windows Vista x64, downloaded and installed it, but it failed to load properly after the reboot.

After dorking around way too much (nearly 90 minutes!), completely mouseless, I finally broke down and did what I should have done in the first place. I pulled up the System Restore facility, selected a restore point from this morning and let it do its magic.

After rebooting, everything was exactly the way it was before I updated the system. I then reapplied the four critical updates plus the networking one. I hid the Tablet (IdeaCOMM) update forever, and all is back to normal and wonderful.

To summarize:

Don’t install optional updates for hardware you don’t own!

If you make any mistake after an update, roll it back immediately!

Lessons to live by. 🙂

VirtualBox Multiboot USB

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Yesterday, I wrote about paying for free software. At the very end of that post, I highlighted a program called Macrium Reflect. That program can automatically create a Linux-based Rescue CD (in order to restore a previously saved image to a damaged or new hard drive).

On their site, they have a good tutorial for how to put that rescue ISO on a USB drive. As long as your BIOS supports booting from the USB drive (most modern ones do), it’s a tad more convenient to carry around a flash (thumb) drive than a CD.

In that tutorial, they use a program called UNetbootin (Universal Netboot Installer). What’s cool about this program (free and open source as well) is it can take practically any ISO and create a bootable USB drive out of it. It has many other cool features (e.g., it can automatically download any number of Linux distros and create a bootable USB or CD without you even knowing the location of the Linux project website!).

UNetbootin uses SysLinux under the covers to create and manage the bootable USB drive. Within SysLinux, there is a single file, syslinux.cfg, which controls the menu of selections that can be booted (different kernels, options to pass to a kernel, etc.).

Now switching gears for a moment, then back to the above to tie it all together…

There are a number of high-quality Virtual Machine programs/products available for all of the major operating systems. The three biggies on Windows are VMware, Virtual PC (directly from Microsoft) and VirtualBox (from Sun). All three are very capable, and all three have at least one version that is completely free.

On my old XP laptop, I used to use VMware Player. It’s free and quite good. I have read that recent versions of Virtual PC are good as well (also free), but I’ve never bothered to install it. While I understand that you can run Linux in Virtual PC, I believe it’s not supported, and I don’t really have a need to run Windows under Windows, so I passed on checking it out.

A few months ago, I stumbled onto VirtualBox. It used to be called InnoTek in a previous incarnation, and was purchased by Sun. There is a free version, which is fully open sourced as well, and there is a proprietary version which adds a few bells and whistles (including some cool USB support), which is available in binary form for free as well (for non–commercial use).

Since I have no interest or need (or capability!) to mess with virtualization source code, I am using the full binary version. On my new Vista Ultimate x64 laptop, I have only VirtualBox installed. I didn’t even download VMware (no knock on their product whatsoever!).

Here is what I like about it. Very fast to load. Full 64 bit support (both their app and guest operating systems!). Virtual PC now has 64 bit support for their own application, but you can only run 32 bit guests (if I understand correctly). Most importantly, I like the fact that it’s more complete (or at least easier to use) than the free version of VMware. I’m way too casual a user (I can go months without launching a VM!) to be willing to pay for VMware Workstation.

So, here are my two normal use cases with VirtualBox, and why I rarely need to run it:

  • Check whether a new Rescue ISO works
  • Do something fancy with ssh and X-Windows

The first one is simple. For emergency purposes, I carry around a few Linux Rescue disks (used to be only CDs, but stay tuned). My current favorite is SystemRescueCD (currently in version 1.1.4). When a new version becomes available, I download, and boot it immediately in VirtualBox, make sure it seems to work correctly, and only then burn it to a CD and toss the old CD.

The second is rarer, but more complicated. On rare occasion, a friend of mine who is running Linux (that I set up for her) on a very old laptop (that I gave to her) has a problem that I can’t talk her through over the phone. When that happens, I fire up CDLinux under VirtualBox, do some port forwarding on my router, do some ssh magic, and take control of her machine (by allowing her to ssh into my box first, so I don’t have to make changes on her firewall!). I can then even run GUI apps from her machine, redirecting the X session back to me!

Anyway, the point is that VirtualBox works really well, has tons of knobs (we’ll get to one of them in a minute), and doesn’t seem to slow down my pretty darn fast system.

Back to our main story…

When I created the Macrium Reflect Rescue CD (burned to a real CD), I also followed the tutorial to creat a bootable USB disk. When I looked at the disk, I saw the SysLinux stuff, and noticed that all of the Macrium files were in a folder.

I then experimented by using UNetbootin to create another bootable USB disk with SystemRescueCD on it. I saw that it used a different directory to store the various Linux kernels that it can boot. I was able to copy that directory to the other USB disk and copy/paste the lines from the syslinux.cfg file on the SystemRescueCD drive into the other syslinux.cfg.

I did the same thing with CDLinux (version 0.9.0 Community Edition). It used the same name for its subdirectory as Macrium did. I renamed the subdirectory before copying it over, and used the new name in the merged syslinux.cfg file. That worked, because once SysLinux gives control to the kernel in the renamed directory, everything else is relative to that new root directory!

I then rebooted my machine to test the new USB disk. It booted perfectly, and I had 28 choices of kernels to boot from! SystemRescueCD offers most of them, but I had Macrium Reflect and a few flavors of CDLinux to choose from as well. I was able to boot both 64 bit and 32 bit versions of SystemRescueCD successfully. Awesome.

Now the big test. I wanted to see whether I could boot that USB disk from VirtualBox. That would allow my normal use case of testing new releases without having to burn and reboot. Unfortunately, the GUI for VirtualBox does not permit an actual hard disk (USB or otherwise) to be directly attached to the VM (at least not for direct booting).

A quick scan of their excellent manual gave me the answer. There is a command line administration tool called VBoxManage.exe that can be used to create a tiny virtual disk (a VMDK file) that essentially points to any real disk or partition. I used that to create this virtual pointer to my USB drive. It worked perfectly.

I then attached that tiny VMDK disk to my virtual machine and fired it up. Voila, I got the same 28 choices to boot from. I couldn’t get the 64 bit versions to work (they boot, but they claim to be missing modules and won’t start X-Windows), but everything else works flawlessly under VirtualBox.

So, now I have a multi-boot USB drive, that I can keep adding stuff to, that I can test under VirtualBox to be sure it will work correctly should I ever have an emergency. It’s a 1GB USB drive, that has all of these various operating systems and tools on it, and I still have 500MB free. 🙂

Cable Woes Resolved

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On December 13th I wrote about my long-standing cable Internet woes. At the end of that note, I mentioned that I would update everyone if my solution worked.

Today is the first day that we are back in the apartment, and I can now report that we’ve had zero drops in the past six hours. That seems to point the finger squarely at the old Netgear FVS318 ProSafe VPN Firewall. While it was working, it was also flaking out unbelievably.

Here’s a big bonus: the WAN port on the FVS router was a 10Mbps port, even though the eight LAN ports were 10/100. The Netgear WNR854T N router that I replaced it with has a 100Mbps WAN port, and GigE LAN ports (purchased re-certified for $40!). So, my download speed was topping out at around 8Mbps on the old router (when it wasn’t dropping packets), but the current one is reliably downloading at 18Mbps! Awesome!

The upload speed is still a very pokey 490Kbps, but you can’t have everything, at least not all the time. 😉

So, I’m now back to 60/40 as to whether I prefer the house to the apartment. Purely due to the Internet connection, I was closer to 90/10 for the past six months!

How little it takes to make me happy. 🙂

Vista speech recognition

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I’ve been fascinated by speech recognition for a very long time.  I used a program called Simon on a NeXT computer back in 1992. I have toyed with every version of Dragon Naturally Speaking since v2 (now owned by Nuance). I keep upgrading my copy of Dragon Naturally Speaking (through v9, I haven’t done v10 yet), even though I never actually use it for anything real beyond checking out how much better each version has gotten.

The primary reason I don’t dictate more is that Lois and I work two feet apart 99% of the time. That makes it awkward to be speaking to the computer, from a number of perspectives. Still, I remain intrigued by the concept.

Vista has built-in speech recognition. My new laptop also has Realtek HD Audio built in, including a very high quality microphone next to the webcam, at the top of the monitor. As an example, I tested it with Skype the other day, with no headset, and there was no echo on either side of the conversation, and the other person said I sounded fine.

That made me think about the extra convenience of being able to dictate without scrounging around for headset, or wearing it for extended periods. I decided to play with the speech recognition just to see.

Basically, it works pretty well. Far from perfect. In fact, I’m not sure that Dragon 10 wouldn’t be better. That said, it’s built in, and feels much lighter weight (starts up instantly, shuts down instantly, doesn’t shift application windows around to put its toolbar up, etc.).

It took me a while to get it to work with my USB headset. Basically, you don’t tell the speech recognition program which device to use. In order to use it with the USB headset, you have to set the USB headset to be the default microphone on the system, and then the speech recognition program automatically picks it up.

You might be asking why I wanted to use the USB headset? The simple reason is that my headset has a microphone mute button on the cord. That’s very cool for speech recognition. If the phone rings, or Lois wants to talk, I can just hit the mute button, and speech recognition is off, even though the program is still listening. It simply can’t hear anything. As a bonus, in theory, the recognition should be better, but for now, I don’t care too much about that.

Here’s one annoyance. It was my intention to dictate this entire post, including all of the actual production of it (clicking the save button, publish, etc.). Unfortunately, I gave up after five minutes. I tend to write my posts in Firefox, right in the admin interface of WordPress. Even with Allow Dictation Everywhere set on in speech recognition, it doesn’t think that Firefox is a normal input program (though it recognizes that I’m in a text area).

So, every phrase gets put up in a dialog box for me to confirm. It got them all correct, but I couldn’t just speak the post. I could have dictated into Word, WordPad, NotePad, WindowsLiveWriter, etc., and in the future I might just do that, but for now, I’m typing this post…

Using speech recognition in Command Mode works reasonably well. I can switch applications easily, select menu items, switch folders in email (Thunderbird, which obviously isn’t written by Microsoft), etc. Yesterday, while eating lunch with both hands, I had an IM conversation with someone by speaking my responses and saying Enter after each one. The concept was very cool, even though I had to correct a bunch of words (I wasn’t using the USB headset at the time).

Anyway, I recommend playing around with speech recognition in Vista if you work in a room alone, or have a spouse (or co-worker) who would be amused by your ranting at the computing out loud. 😉

Cable Internet Woes

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A long time ago (I can’t remember when), we had a stable, reliable connection in the apartment (provided by Time Warner Cable). It was never super fast on the download (when it was stable, it was roughly 3Mpbs downstream). It was always pokey on the upstream (used to be roughly 360Kpbs). Now, it’s typically 7-8Mbps down, and 490Kbps up.

Unfortunately, while both up and down have gotten faster, the experience has deteriorated. I wish I could point the finger directly at Time Warner, but I can’t. Not because it’s not their fault, but because I have no idea, and that’s been hugely frustrating…

I may be slow to fix things at times, but I’m typically pretty good at diagnosing. I’m completely lost at the moment.

It’s been bad for such a long time, that I’ve come to accept it on some levels, and that’s just silly on my part.

Here are the symptoms: regular disconnects from the Internet. Those drops can last between a few seconds to a minute. The most sensitive applications (the early warning systems) are IM clients (Digsby for me, Trillian for Lois, but Pidgin used to behave identically before I switched to Digsby). Email clients hang if they are fetching or sending at the moment of the drop. When the drops last a bit longer, ssh connections are lost, but not on the short drops. The Poker client disconnects every 20-30 minutes.

Here’s my setup. I had (more on that in a moment) a seven year old Toshiba cable modem (provided by Time Warner). I have a Netgear FVS318 ProSafe VPN Firewall that connects to the cable modem. Years ago, I used it in VPN mode to connect to the office, but now it’s just a plain old router. Connected to that are three devices: an Asterisk server, VoIP ATA (Sipura) and a WiFi router.

After working great for years, when the trouble started, I suspected the wireless router (at the time, it was a Linksys WRT54G). I swapped it for a US Robotics spare that I had sitting around. The US Robotics device exhibited different problems. It went for longer periods without drops, but then would drop for longer periods (rebooting it seemed to always work). Since it was a bit older, and only a B router, I bought a Netgear WNR854T (an N router). I bought it re-certified.

It behaves just like the Linksys did, more frequent drops, but of shorter duration, that always auto-correct. I know, it’s re-certified, but still, three WiFi routers in a row? Yesterday, while at the house, enjoying my fantastic Verizon FiOS connection (30Mbps down, 5Mbps up), it occurred to me that the only thing all three WiFi routers have in common is the port they share on the FVS318 router.

I was actually excited to have a theory to test. When we got to the apartment mid-morning, I fired up the laptop, and swapped both the cable and the port that connected the WiFi router to the FVS. No Internet connection at all! What? We were just here on Wednesday, and it was working (albeit with the stated problems).

Rebooting the cable modem indicated that the cable modem just decided to die. I marched to the Time Warner service center. The one thing Time Warner does extremely well (and, unfortunately, I’ve taken advantage of this good service way too many times!), is staff a service center and swap devices quickly, with no questions asked.

I got there at about noon on a Saturday, and there were roughly 15 people working the service desks. It took less than five minutes to have my number called, and less than two minutes to swap the cable modem. 15 minutes later, I was back in the apartment (at least I got a bit of exercise). The new cable modem worked right away (still using the new cable and new port from the WiFi to the FVS).

A quick speed test gave me the sense that all of my problems were done. I got 8Mbps down and 492Kbps up, but with no jerkiness in the numbers. A smooth connection, it seemed. All joy died about 20 minutes later, when I had my first IM drop out.

So, in theory, it could still be the cable modem (or the cable company, at the head end). But, I left out a major detail which makes me believe that this is not the case. All of our phone calls are VoIP, so they use the cable modem as well. Whenever we experience a drop on the IM client, if either of us is on the phone, there is no drop on the call. At least, it’s not discernible (which doesn’t mean that a packet isn’t dropped along the way).

I am at my wits end. I have two things that I can try. One is to bypass the WiFi with a PowerLine connection (the cable modem is not in the room where we work). That will work, but if there are any drops, it won’t be clear that it isn’t the PowerLine adapter. The second thing is more painful. I just did the second one this minute. I reprogrammed the WiFi router to completely replace the FVS318. Since we’re leaving now, I won’t know until the next time we’re back whether this will solve the problem. If it does, then it means that the FVS was flaking out in general, somehow.

While it’s possible that three WiFi routers in a row are all bad, in a similar (if not exact) way, somehow, I doubt it. It is ironic that the cable modem just up and died, but the new one is exhibiting the exact same problem, so I don’t think it’s the problem either. For completeness sake, I should report that we are both using brand new laptops, with built-in N WiFi cards. Before that, we were each using Netgear N Cards. Before that, we used different model B and G USB-based WiFi adapters (with the old Linksys and US Robotics), all with the same drops, so it’s most definitely not the client devices!

If any of you have any suggestions out there for what else I can try, I’m all ears!

Welcome WordPress 2.7

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I just upgraded to WordPress 2.7. It was super simple, no glitches whatsoever.

Earlier in the day, I noticed that there was an updated version of the Simple Tags plugin that I use, clearly stating that it worked with 2.7. I upgraded that while still running 2.6.5.

Then I upgraded WordPress to 2.7 on my laptop, running XAMPP. The only complaint I got was about Simple Tags, which I hadn’t upgraded on the laptop (and I updated it then). All other plugins just worked, and the new theme, PrimePress just worked as well.

I hadn’t installed any betas or release candidates before, so this is my first real look at the new admin interface. I’ve seen screen shots, and it’s crisp, clean and reasonably intuitive.

I’m officially a fan, even though I clearly haven’t exercised it in any meaningful way yet. 🙂

P.S. First glitch, the Preview link gave me a 404, so something isn’t being put where it should be. Can’t find an obvious cause, so I’m punting for now, and just publishing. I’ll track down my preview problem over the weekend…

Update: I just did a test of Preview on the laptop, and it worked fine. So, there isn’t anything wrong at the WP level. I am now quessing that something about the URL scheme for Previews changed slightly, and my own rules at the NginX level are failing (the equivalent of Apache rewrite rules). When I’m sure, I’ll update again…

Solution: This morning, I discovered that if I override the permalink in the preview URL and use the old-style ?p=NNN format, the preview worked. That allowed me to search with more detail. That turned up the following patch. Ironically, the patch was just posted yesterday, so I wouldn’t have found it on Friday anyway. I don’t know if it works (because I haven’t made a new post since I applied the patch), but at least I can preview by using the old-style URL if need be…

Internet Connection Sharing

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Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) has been around for a long time (formally, and through hack-like methods). I have never had a need for it (slightly amazing) until now. Yesterday I wrote about our current hotel WiFi woes. In that post, I wrote that I wouldn’t need to worry about it today, given that I would only be in the hotel for two waking hours.

After a very early breakfast, I decided to try ICS for the first time, just for yucks. There are a number of ways that I could have set it up, each as easy as the next, but I had one specific scenario in mind.

I set up Lois’ old laptop on the desk in the outer room (we’re in an Embassy Suites, so we have two rooms). I pulled out my small Linksys travel router and plugged it in there as well. I set my laptop up in the bedroom.

On Lois’ machine, I turned on ICS (there is a simple wizard) and told it that the Sprint Broadband Connection (through the USB cable to her Treo) was the real Internet connection. I then told the wizard that the wired port was the shared connection. I then plugged in the Linksys router to the wired port, with the Internet (WAN) port on the Linksys rather than the Ethernet port. So, the Linksys would be getting it’s IP address from the laptop.

Since my laptop is already configured to connect to the travel router, I didn’t need to make any changes to my machine. I went into the bedroom, and poof, I was on the Internet! This time, the Treo had a better connection than the day before, and I was getting 757Kbps downstream and 124Kbps upstream. That’s a faster downstream connection than I had yesterday on the paid WiFi!

I have heard that ICS on a Mac is brain-dead simple, and I have no doubt that it is. I can now confirm that it’s pretty darn simple on Windows too (Lois’ laptop that was serving the connection is Windows XP). You have to pick which network device is the real one, and which is the shared one, but other than that, nothing else to do.

I now don’t need to consider the hotel WiFi dilemma. Once Lois changes to the new laptop, I’ll have to consider getting an Express Card version of the modem, now that I know we can easily share that connection when necessary. It will still end up being an insurance policy, since we almost always have a free wired or WiFi connection wherever we are.

Victory! 🙂